Julie Guest Direct Response Copywriter, Marketing Strategist, Best Selling Author

business coach

The Marketing Secret Of How To Sell A $19 Shirt for $89

Picture this. You’re thumbing through the pages of a slim, elegant, catalog that arrived via mail earlier in the day.

The pages feel crisp to the touch, and you notice how vibrant the illustrations are. Captivating even. You glance over and something catches your eye.

A European-styled, heirloom leather satchel. Its mellow leather beckons to you. Brass fittings glinting in the sun harkening back to a by-gone era. It’s the kind of satchel that would have been casually tossed into the back of your father’s 1932 Auburn V-12 Boattail Speedster; perhaps an unread Hemingway novel inside.

“Hmmm, possibly…” you murmur quietly to yourself.

You thumb slowly to the next page.

Your eyes transfix upon a gently sketched blue shirt, its sleeves half rolled up, the hemline gently blowing in the cool spring air.

You read the description:

A Montana Shirt

He rode to Great Falls in the autumn of 1880, another rich kid from the big city. The locals harrumphed, “Montana ain’t St Louis. Once the shine wears off, he’ll be gone quick as a duck on a Junebug.”

The “shine” wore off.

He stayed.

He tried raising sheep; lost every sheep in the herd. Tried hunting; similar success. He lived a while with the Blood Indians. Taught himself how to paint.

He didn’t wrestle with the existential questions; didn’t know there were any. He painted what was around him. Grizzlies, buffalo, rustlers. life.

In his own words: “I am an illustrator. There are lots better ones, but some worse. Any man that can make a living doing what he likes is lucky, and I am that.”

Men like him don’t travel in herds. You find them one at a time.

A Montana Shirt (No. 3682). “I made it with yarn dyed pure linen, and upon close observation, a very small checked pattern, because it was a feeling I had. Buttons are Trocas shell. Flat felled seams. Two-button adjustable mitered cuffs with top stitching. Shirttail hem with gussets at side.“

Men’s sizes: S, M, L, XL, XXL Colors: Open Range Blue Price $89

And that, Dear Reader, is how you sell a shirt that would ordinarily sell for a mere fraction of the price, at top dollar. Sight unseen. Gladly paid.

The strength of your sales copy is everything.

What an African Lion & Restoration Hardware Can Teach You About How NOT To Run Your Business

A couple weeks ago I ordered a new desk chair from a Restoration Hardware catalog. Here’s the sales copy that sold me:

1950s French Metal Wire 26" - 32" Stool

Dating to the mid-20th-century, our French metal chair hails from the offices of a Paris museum – a work of modern art in its own right. With a nod to iconic design forms, it has a scooped seat and curved back made from heavy gauge wire grids padded with optional leather-clad cushions, sold separately. Adjustable seat height and lumbar support adapt to each individual. Six ball casters make it as agile as it is comfortable.

Sounds pretty cool right? I thought so – so much so that I even ordered the 1940s French Factory Work Table (writing desk) to go with it. And that’s when the problems started.

Now I happen to love Restoration Hardware – I think the quality of its furniture and sense of design is pretty hard to beat. But its customer experience sure leaves a LOT to be desired.

Here’s what happened next. After placing my order I received a cryptic response email that made me have to pick up the phone and speak to a warm body to make sure my order went through. It apparently had but, unfortunately, both the chair and the leather cushion I had ordered were no longer available (even though their website said they were).

I then got passed around like a hot potato from one rep to the next.

After 45 minutes on the phone I was ready to abandon ship, cancel my order and forget I ever laid eyes on the furniture. I was not a happy camper. However at the last minute my order went through and I was relieved to have survived the ordering ordeal.

That was until the scheduled delivery time for my order. Neither my desk nor my chair showed up. Exasperated I called back. “Sorry but those items should have been delivered. We have a record of them leaving our warehouse.” Well, fat lot of good that does me. Some truck driver somewhere is writing his award winning screen play, likely with his muffin top spilling over his tight blue jeans, plonked on my wire chair.

I was told, “Sorry Ma’am we don’t have any more in stock. They’re on back order and should arrive in about sixty to ninety days.” Sixty to ninety days? Really? I’m guessing someone had to walk back to China or India or wherever the chairs are made for that kind of delay.

I received barely an apology and no offer of free anything – no “Here’s a gift certificate for your troubles,” or “We’ll refund your shipping fee.” None of that.

Now one thing you need to know about Restoration Hardware is how it positions itself in the marketplace.

Here’s the sales copy taken straight from the website: “We operate as a curator of the finest historical design the world has to offer. Our collections of timeless, updated classics and reproductions are presented consistently across our sales channels in sophisticated and unique lifestyle settings that we believe are on par with world-class interior designers.”

It’s no doubt a luxury brand but frankly I’ve had better customer service from a grumpy pre-menopausal counter clerk at the Post Office.

Restoration Hardware has great marketing, and uses powerfully persuasive copywriting coupled with gorgeous imagery. It offers top quality products.

But that’s about where the wheels start coming off. It couldn’t have made it more difficult for me to give them my money. And their customer service stinks.

This business reminds me precisely of the “Situational Awareness” photo from my cousin.

It’s so eager to find the next big opportunity in its business, it has lost sight of the thing that could take the company down: lousy customer experience.

Restoration Hardware isn’t the only business that does this. Most do to varying degrees.

The lesson is this: always looking for bigger, better opportunities to grow your business is great, but never lose sight of what made your business great in the first place.

Are You Using Emotionally Charged Marketing to Get More Clients? A Case Study About Chinese Women and Their Body Hair Issues

The other day I was reading through one of the business magazines I subscribe to. It was an early Sunday morning and, with a cup of coffee in hand, I was just casually thumbing through the pages. At the bottom of the page my eye caught a little article about Chinese women and their “body hair issues.” Intrigued, I read on. Turns out Chinese women don’t have body hair issues; at least they didn’t until the company behind Veet hair removal cream decided to launch their product in China in 2005. Unfortunately for the company, sales were sluggish. The product was considered too pricey and the product size too big. The biggest problem though? Most Chinese women have very little body hair and those who do didn’t worry about it.

So the company changed its marketing strategy. It started rolling out ads equating hair-free skin with beauty, health, confidence and “shining glory.” In the process the company has made every Chinese woman more conscious of every stray follicle.

By “educating” its customers and encouraging “fuzz phobia,” Veet is now the fastest growing brand in China for its parent company Reckitt Benckiser. Hair remover sales in Asia are rising 20% annually, almost double the rate of women’s razor blades.

This marketing strategy of getting women to focus on their perceived flaws is not a new one. Actually it’s about as old as the hills, but here’s the reason it’s so effective (not just on women – but on everyone).

We all base our buying decisions on how an ad, promotion or product makes us feel. Not on what it will do for us.

As human beings we are all hard wired to want the same things. We can’t help it – it’s in our DNA. We want things like better health, more money, great popularity, improved appearance, praise from others, more comfort, more leisure time, a happy life. If your marketing can whip people into a lather by appealing to one of these deep desires – you’ve got gold.

It makes no logical sense for Chinese women (who are possibly the least follicly challenged among us), to become the fastest growing users of hair removal cream. Chinese women are not buying based on whether this makes logical sense. They’re buying because of their desire for an improved appearance and happy life. They want to feel beautiful by buying the product.

This isn’t just a woman thing either.

Men buy the same way. Think about your neighbor down the street who goes out and buys himself a new Chevy Silverado truck, fully loaded. He tells himself that it’s because the truck has extremely good towing capacity and a long truck bed and it will be a safe ride for the family. But his real decision to buy is an emotional one – he loves the way this big new truck makes him feel. Tough. Strong. Powerful. He likes getting the approval of his friends and neighbors who nod admiringly as he drives past. He loves the excitement on his kids’ faces as they climb into the cab and ogle at all the shiny new buttons and heated leather seats.

The take-away for your business is this: To really create powerful marketing, you need to supercharge your sales copy with emotion – not logic. At the end of the day, as human beings, we all want the same things: To feel good about ourselves and to be happy.

So if people aren’t getting excited about buying your product or service, it’s likely not because of anything other than that you’re marketing to them the wrong way. Emotionally charged marketing is the fastest way to “manifest” desire. That’s the real trigger that gets people to buy.

As Mark Twain said, “There’s two reasons a man buys anything. The reason he’ll give you… and the real reason.”

The 5 Biggest Copywriting Mistakes (And How To Fix ‘Em’)

“I have always believed that writing advertisements is the second most profitable form of writing. The first, of course, is ransom notes.”-Philip Dusenberry

There are a lot of definitions about what copywriting is and isn’t. Salesmanship in print. Writing to sell. Salesmanship multiplied. Or my personal favorite, persuasion writing.

Advertising would well and truly be extinct if each of us could talk to our prospects face-to-face. But as we can’t, our advertisements have to do the job and get the word out for us.

That’s why good copywriting is the oxygen of your business. Get it right, and the sky‘s the limit. But get it wrong, and your business is banished to the ranks of the mediocre, the forgotten, and the ignored.

Here are the 5 biggest copywriting mistakes, and how to fix them:

1. “Nobody reads ads. People read what interests them. Sometimes it’s an ad.” Howard Gossage

One of the worst things you can do is write copy that’s boring to read. If an honest reading of your website or new client brochure makes your eyeballs dry up, or triggers an urgent need to go to the bathroom – then just image how your poor prospect must feel. Remember, you can only interest a person into buying your product, you can’t bore them.

2. Build the relationship first, ask for the sale second. As a direct response copywriter, I see many examples of bad marketing that rush the entire sales process. In this new economy, all buying power has returned to the consumer. And they know it. You can’t just expect to trundle out a cart full of your wares and have people flocking to buy them. That may have been how it worked in the boom days of the early 2000s, but certainly not today. Today, marketing is all about building relationships first. Your copy has to carefully do the same, not rush straight to the close.

3. Don’t ever try and make your copy apply to everyone. You have to niche your message along with your market. One of the biggest mistakes I see is using ad copy that is worded so generically, it doesn’t apply to anyone in particular at all. This is very bad. At first blush you might think the more people you can fit into your marketing message, the better. Wrong. Quite the opposite. The more you tightly target your marketing message to resonate with a niche, the higher the response rate. This goes back to the first point. People will only read what interests them. If you’re a retired dentist with $2 million in investable assets, 3 grandchildren and a condo in Florida, you’re far more likely to read ad copy that specifically “talks to you.”

4. Make your advertising valuable. Few people understand this extremely important point, which is why most advertising falls on deaf ears. Nothing screams out “I want to sell you sell you something” more than an advertisement that looks and sounds like an advert. That’s why writing copy that sounds like an editorial piece, using white papers, or creating a helpful animated video will typically attract a much higher level of viewership.

5. Incorporate unquestionable copy into your proof. Most copy is seriously devoid of all proof but full of empty, hollow sounding promises like “we’re the leading experts” or “your trusted provider”, etc. We’re so used to reading these claims they wash over us like tiny ocean ripples swirling around our ankles. Unnoticed. One of the strongest elements of proof is, of course, proof in your product itself. A bold guarantee to back up your promises. Legions of testimonials to say what you can’t say yourself. A product demonstration even. Proof is usually the most often overlooked aspect of any copy. If you can find a way to add it in a compelling way, it can transform even the most meager of ads into the mighty.

How To Tell If You’re An Entrepreneur (Or Not)

If you thought (like I used to), – that being an entrepreneur was just another word for being a small business owner, then listen up. To paraphrase Mark Twain, they’re about as similar as lightning and lightning bugs.

A small business owner opens a jewelry store. He works hard. He makes money. But 10 years down the line, his business pretty much looks exactly the same as it did in those first few years. He’s grown, sure. But it’s still the same jewelry business.

Now, take that same store and have it run by an entrepreneur. In 10 years time you likely won’t even recognize the original business because of all the different revenue steams he’ll have spun off, new businesses he’ll have begun, and markets he’ll have expanded into.

For starters, he’s probably bought the building his store is located in. He has leveraged that investment to cherry pick the best commercial real estate in town and is now leasing to other business owners (real estate).

Then he developed an exclusive line of jewelry which caters to boomer women. That line is now being sold at exclusive cocktail parties and has spawned a business of selling jewelry franchises to other boomer women who like to throw parties. Now he’s just getting warmed up.

He also built a huge cult-like following online for his personal line of jewelry, started his own internet version of the QVC channel, and launched a complimentary anti-aging makeup product line that is now being sold at the jewelry parties.

Meantime, he’s busy cooking up deals to sell exclusive golf apparel to active women and is looking at expanding and offering adventure trips of a lifetime to far flung bucket list places for the same demographic. But that’s not all. This dynamo entrepreneur also runs a highly successful information marketing company – he’s coach to multiple high paying mastermind groups and has created products teaching other jewelers to do just what he’s done…

Make your head spin? Think it’s impossible? I’ve had multiple clients who have accomplished all this and more in just two short years.

So how do you tell whether you’re an entrepreneur or not? Well, everyone had to start somewhere.

Here’s how to know if you’re cut out to be an entrepreneur (…and yes, being an entrepreneur is a learned skill, so if you’re not there yet start taking notes):

  1. An entrepreneur is not married to any one type of business. If you ask the typical small business owner what he or she does, you’ll likely hear “I’m an attorney,” “I’m a dentist” or “I own a restaurant.” Entrepreneurs think expansively and don’t put themselves inside any one box. Their strength is their ability to see an opportunity and make it a reality. Our world is changing faster than ever, so flexibility and agility in business is critical. As one of my mentors once said, “If you’re trying to be in the same business 5 years from now, you’ll likely be out of business.”
  2. Entrepreneurs create and make money from their ideas. They’re typically lousy managers, or manage people at their own extreme discomfort. That’s why they often start, develop, and sell businesses, and then move on. The skill set to start and build a highly successful business is a very different skill set than managing a highly successful business. That’s also why you’ll see lots of entrepreneurs hire CEOs – so the CEO can take over and run the business for them while they’re busy exploring the next big opportunity.
  3. Entrepreneurs understand that the real business they’re in is the sales and marketing business. No matter the widget sold, or service peddled – entrepreneurs understand their business success thrives or dies on the strength of their marketing and sales. That’s their real business.
  4. Entrepreneurs are systems driven. They understand the secret to success is in implementing systems to leverage time, increase efficiencies, reduce costs and automate processes. At the top of this list is investment in a marketing system that automatically delivers an endless supply of high quality prospects through the door, converts them to paying customers, and keeps them as raving fans for life.
  5. Entrepreneurs are never out of school. They are insatiable learners, heavily investing in their own education, attending seminars, boot camps, business coaching programs, and mastermind groups. Adventurers of life, entrepreneurs are endlessly curious, can pack more into a week than most people get done a year and are always looking for mentors, guides and teachers to show them the short cuts…

The 5 Helpful Marketing Tips to Write Better Ad Copy

Tucker the American Bulldog (my other partner in crime) has been hurling his guts out for the last couple of days.  Must have eaten something iffy.  So I have to make this week’s article short – I’ve got one eye on him now to make sure he doesn’t chuck up on Bella, (my favorite bean bag) while I’m talking to you. Short n’ Sweet, here it is: 5 Copywriting Tips to Write Better Sales Copy.

  1. Fall in love with your product or service.  If you don’t love it, you can’t sell it.  Ask my Mom about that one (she refuses to work with any client who doesn’t wholeheartedly believe in what they’re selling).
  2. Know your target market.  Study ‘em, sniff ‘em, scout ‘em out.  If you don’t really understand them you can’t sell to them
  3. Don’t ever be boring.  If your first paragraph doesn’t get you all hot and heavy and lathered up into a frenzy, then don’t expect your prospects to feel any differently.
  4. Don’t try and impress with big fancy words. Using big words don’t make you look like a Top Dawg, they make you look like a douche.  Talk so people can understand you.
  5. Be very clear what action you want someone to take.  Should they go fetch a stick?  Bark at the neighbor’s dog next door?  You decide what that is, but whatever it is, spell-it-out.  People aren’t as smart as you think.

That’s it from me!  Adios-ruff!

Bear

What To Do When People Aren’t Buying

The huge sea change of marketing a business is well and truly upon us.  What used to make people buy in a frenzy, today has people yawning, reaching for the delete button, “unfriending,” and changing channels. Simply put, people aren’t buying the same way they used to.  I’ve noticed a big difference in even the last few years, which is just another reason it’s essential you stay on top of your marketing with fresh ad copy, fresh offers, fresh content.  There’s no such thing as set and forget!

Today’s emerging new economy consumer is far pickier, far more suspicious and far more nervous to part with their hard earned cash. Understandably so.  We’re in the trust damaged and post recession world.

If you’re struggling with getting more clients, then here are 5 valuable marketing tips to help you get things cranking again.

  1. Is your message getting lost in translation?  You might be surprised to discover that a large number of your prospects are simply not buying from you because they don’t fully understand what you do or, most importantly, how it benefits them.  A rewrite of your value proposition and companies core messaging (to answer questions like “Why should I do business with you versus any and every other business out there?”) – will do wonders for your business.  Clarity is everything.  But a clear message worded in such a way that deeply resonates with your target market is magnetic.  If your business hasn’t got your messaging perfected then it doesn’t matter what media you use and what market you choose – people aren’t going to buy like they should.
  2.  Are you following up?  C’mon now, really? Out of all the hundreds of companies I’ve written copy for, coached or consulted with, I can count on four fingers the number of businesses that had a robust follow up process for those people who said no.  Remember that old adage that people don’t care what you know until they know how much you care?  Couldn’t be more true in the new economy.  The more steps, and the more media your follow up encompasses, the more effective it’ll be.
  3. Make ‘em an offer they can’t refuse.  Most times people decide NOT to buy not because something is too expensive, but because they’re scared they’ll be stuck with a lemon. One of the secrets to getting people to buy is to make it easier for them to say yes than no.
  4. Hold a focus group of your top clients and find out if what you think is important to them really still is.  Get your finger on the pulse of the people you’re marketing to.  Dive into the trenches with them.  Go hang out at their offices for a day.  Read what they read.  Join the groups they join.When writing copy or marketing a business, I spend at least 50% of my time digging around the target market, researching it in depth and getting my thinking in line with theirs.
  5. Write a great sales letter.  If people aren’t buying, maybe it’s because your sales pitch hasn’t hit the right note, or maybe your message isn’t reaching enough people.  The great, late copywriter Gary Halbert said that there’s no problem that can’t be fixed by a great sales letter.  It’s very true.  A well-written sales letter has been the tipping point for many businesses (just ask the Wall St Journal who used the same sales letter for 28 years and earned more than a billion dollars with it).

The bottom line is ­– if your prospects aren’t buying, it’s your marketing that needs work.  Sometimes just a fine tune is all that’s needed.  Other times it’s a complete overhaul.  Remember – your prospects are going to buy from someone so make sure it’s you!

Direct Response Success!

Today’s Direct Response Copywriting Tip comes to you from under the desk (not the couch).  This is where my writing inspiration runs the highest (plus I get first option on any lunch scraps that happen to fall from the heavens). Today I want to tell you a short story that illustrates the importance of testing and tweaking in your marketing.

My Mom has been working with one of our private clients over the last 5 months developing a brand new niche for them (they’re pediatricians looking to move into the branded health food supplement market).

We developed a great little marketing system for them that included this very cool sales letter wrapped inside a miniature plastic trash can (my suggestion for the record, was to wrap the letter inside a rawhide bag but  that didn’t fly).

Anyhow, this one little sales letter was pulling about a 4% response rate (not too shabby when the industry average for direct mail is less than 0.5%.

But here’s the kicker.

By tweaking just one tiny thing in our letter (and I mean tiny) we got an additional 2% in response rate.  Two percent!!!

That’s like a lifetime supply of Milk Bones!

When you hear what we tweaked you’ll be stunned.

It really was tiny.

Ready to hear what it was?

On the outside of the envelope (remember this was a bulky mail item with the little trashcan inside), we used a big red stamp that had just 4 words written on it – FOR YOUR EYES ONLY!

Amazing, huh?

So there are the big lessons in all this for you:

1)    Always track your marketing so you know what’s working and what isn’t

2)    Always be testing to try and improve your marketing results

3)    When it comes to writing copy, little things really can make a BIG difference

4)    You humans are a weird unpredictable bunch – who would have known that one silly red stamp would get so many more of you to raise your hands!  No wonder copywriting can be so complex!

How to succeed as a Solopreneur no matter what the economy is doing...

Here's an indisputable reality that as entrepreneurs, just about all of us have encountered at some point ... There are a lot of "dream stealers" out there. These are the people who hear you talk about your business, or your business idea and will tell you to "get real".

They'll go on to remind you that more than 6 million people start a business each year.

And they'll tell you that 3 out of 4 of these businesses will fail (yikes).

They'll also tell you that the economy is "so tough right now" that you don't have a hope of making it.

And they'll probably suggest you should go find a nice "safe" job" or not dream "so big" until "things get better".

Actually the person who's telling you this is probably saying it because their innermost secret desire is to own their own business themselves but they're just too petrified to take the plunge and make it happen.

Or they've failed in the past and have given up.

That's ok.

Being a Solopreneur is DEFINITELY not for everyone. And yes it IS challenging at times.

But that doesn't mean you can't succeed.

And it certainly doesn't mean that you should sit out this "tough economy" and wait for things to improve...you might be sitting for a long time.

Take me for example.

When I relocated my marketing company to Michigan, people told me I was insane. The economy had just tanked, layoffs were happening like tidal waves and people were fleeing the state in droves. Add to that the fact I was a single Mom of a new born and the number of people I knew in Michigan could be counted on one hand.

I guess you could say from the outside that the odds of me succeeding were stacked, well, mile high.

But on the inside, I knew differently. I believed differently. I acted differently.

I was crystal clear on my intent to succeed.

I set about surrounding myself with other highly successful entrepreneurs, who had reinvented their businesses and created massive opportunity for themselves.

I shut out "the noise" and got busy.

Not to say this was an easy process. Looking back it was one of the hardest things I've ever done. There were days, weeks even when I seriously questioned my own sanity and thought about throwing in all in.

But I'm so glad I didn't.

Within 6 months I had created a six figure business doing work that I loved, on my terms, with clients who I absolutely loved working with. No more long distance travel needed. Total flexibility to pick and choose my work hours: if I'd been up half the night with my daughter who couldn't settle, I could take the next morning off and catch up on sleep.

And I'd done it Michigan - one of the most recession ravaged states in the country where its common to meet someone who's been out of work for 3 years.

I'm not sharing this with you to toot my own horn.

I'm sharing this with you to show you how you can CREATE YOUR OWN ECONOMY as a Solopreneur and be successful NO MATTER WHAT'S GOING ON IN THE WORLD OUTSIDE, AND NO MATTER WHAT OTHER PEOPLE TELL YOU IS POSSIBLE.

So, here are 3 truths about how to build a successful business as a Solopreneur in any economy

1 - In order to grow your business, you have to grow yourself first Where ever you're at in your business right now, you can't expect to achieve wild success by following what most other people are doing. It means having the courage to not follow the herd and do things differently.

Radically differently sometimes.

This usually has to start with seeking out a coach, mentor, or teacher who has walked the path you're wanting to walk, holds the same values you hold, and has what you want.

You can try to go things alone and do it the hard, lonely, frustrating way...or you can seek out other successful people to learn from and cut short your own learning curve by 10 or even 20 years.

When I made the decision I wanted to leave my legal career to become a professional copywriter, I knew it was going to take some serious time and money investment to come anywhere close to me being able to replace my income level.

I never bought the whole nobility thing of being a "starving writer" (in my book there's no glory in starving). So I set about seeking out the very best teachers I could find who were themselves highly successful entrepreneurs and marketers.

The very first coaching program I invested in was $35,000 (gasp) which even today is still an eye popping amount of money for most people to think about spending on their own personal development. Thanks to the wisdom learned from that course I was able to earn a 6 figure income straight out the gate in my very first year as a freelance copywriter. That's practically unheard of in my industry where the average earnings, even for "seasoned pros" is less than $40,000.

But as you may already know, I am definitely a hare not a tortoise (by the way it was really the hare who won that race, the tortoise actually got sidetracked, forgot where he was headed and wound up getting eaten by a pack of rogue wolves.) I'm not interested in trying to reinvent the wheel. If someone's already cracked the code and traveled the path I want to take then I'll happily pay to learn from them so that I can arrive faster at my goals.

The lesson in this for you is... catapult your business to where you want it to go by investing in yourself FIRST.

Don't wait "until you're successful" - that's too late!

Invest in YOU. You're worth it!

2 - Systems Rock

If you are an entrepreneur, you're probably great at "winging it."

Only problem is that you live in chaos, and everything on your to-do list is super urgent. Keep this up - and you'll eventually burn out (I know, because this is exactly how I used to run my business and...burnt out doing).

Its no secret that the most successful businesses in the world all heavily rely on systems. McDonalds is a perfect example. Every action, every task has been boiled down to an exact process that's repeated again and again, effortlessly.

This is exactly how your marketing needs to operate. Your marketing shouldn't be a series of random acts that you hurriedly fling together when you need new clients, and pray something happens from.

Implementing a marketing system in your business will enable you to regulate your cash flow, have a dependable income every month and give you the head space you need to really focus on growing your business (instead of wondering if you'll be able to pay off all your bills this month)

3 - Care deeply about your clients

I am constantly horrified at the number of businesses who take a churn and burn attitude to their clients.

Don't like our service? Tough....we don't care....we've got your money already...next!

One of the best "recession proof" marketing strategies is to care deeply about your clients and their success.

Do things that others would never be prepared to do - say yes to their requests, where others would say no. Always be looking for ways to add massive value to their lives. Do this and you will create a loyal following of raving fans who will stick by you and your company like glue in good times and in bad!